Institute of Charted IT Professionals | ICITP-SA

Accreditation Process

(Approval by an Industry regulatory body) ICITP’s accreditation means your institution is not only offering academic qualifications or vendor certifications but in addition, it offers recognized professional qualifications recognized by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and is registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).  

Your Institution can obtain Professional
qualifications recognized by SAQA

This refers to a learning institution acquiring professional recognition to deliver professional certifications offered by ICITP. A learning institution needs to acquire various forms of accreditation to ensure that they are delivering quality & recognized qualifications to the public. An institution, depending on the level it wishes to deliver training (primary, secondary, tertiary) will need to acquire accreditation from the relevant Quality Council whether these offerings are locally recognized qualifications or international OEM or vendor certifications.

For example, in the Republic of South Africa, academic & professional qualifications are registered on the National Qualification Framework (NQF) with various levels. To offer Academic qualifications from NQF Level 1-4 an institution or training provider would need to acquire accreditation from Umalusi &/or the Quality Council for Trades & Occupations (QCTO) or from a relevant Sector Educational Training Authority (SETA)

 

Accreditation

To offer Academic qualifications from NQF Level 5-10 an institution or training provider would need to acquire accreditation from the Council of Higher Education (CHE) &/or the Quality Council for Trades & Occupations (QCTO)

To offer OEM or Vendor certifications accreditation would be acquired from the responsible stakeholder (e.g.) SAP, Oracle, Microsoft, CompTIA, Huawei, Amazon, Asus, Cisco, Hewlett Packard (etc.)

To offer Professional Qualifications/Designations/Certifications, accreditation or training licenses would be acquired from the respective professional bodies e.g. the Institute of Chartered IT Professionals (ICITP), the Health Practitioners Council of South Africa (HPCSA), the Financial Planning Institute (FPI), the South Africa Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA), Law Society of South Africa (LSSA) (etc.) 

Your institution can now acquire professional accreditation to offer professional programs This means your institution can now acquire accreditation not only to offer academic qualifications but also for professional qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF)

The difference between Academic and Professional Qualifications.

Whilst both academic qualifications and professional qualifications are recognized and controlled by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and both are indicative of a certain level of achievement, the levels of recognition of these forms of qualification are not always on par. Although there are various differences between the two, is this distinction in recognition correct, or is too much impetus being placed on academics alone? Not all qualifications are equal, even though this is the primary vision and mission of the NQF.

A new approach to academic and professional qualifications Perhaps a better approach would be for the two to work together to produce a skilled workforce that has both an academic knowledge of the job at hand and the real-world skills to perform the tasks required. Should the good of the country not be the driving force behind education and training, rather than the size of our egos?

There are various fundamental differences between these forms of qualification. An academic qualification involves the study of a subject with an academic discipline and (hopefully) research focus. The overriding purpose of this qualification is a contribution to the learner’s specialized knowledge of a subject and not necessarily the application thereof.

The purpose of a professional qualification is to impart knowledge, understanding and practical experience to the learner to enable the learner to apply the knowledge in a practical manner, in a professional practice. This obviously leads to a completely different set of skills, each with different purposes and contexts for the world of work.

A learner at The Institute of People Development (IPD) recently asked why the NQF level 5 National Diploma in ETDP was taking her longer and was more difficult than her NQF level 9 qualification from an academic institution. The answer is quite simple; in order to prove competence in an occupationally directed professional qualification it must be proven that the learner has knowledge and understanding of the theory (foundational competence), that the learner has the ability to apply that knowledge and understanding practically (practical competence), and that the learner has the ability to apply that knowledge, understanding and practical skill in an ever changing environment (reflexive competence).

What makes these qualifications different?


On the one hand, a professional qualification is usually made up of on-the-job training and various short courses, which when combined make up a qualification. On the other hand, the academic route focuses on the theory rather than practical application and leads to a qualification. With either approach, this formal qualification comes with a title that can be utilized infinitely, yet more often than not these titles are not treated as equal in the recruitment space.

If regulated by a professional body in the form of a professional designation, such titles must be renewed through annual reregistration with the regulatory body and include continuous professional development (CPD) activities to prove the currency of the skill/s.

The most striking difference between these forms of qualification is perhaps that a professional qualification, due to the nature of the training and the fact that it is built on practice analysis, offers a warrant of competence and expertise. It therefore certifies that, having completed the course or training, the graduate has the essential knowledge and skills to perform the duties required of his/her profession.

In contrast, an academic qualification does not certify competence and is not based on a systematic or formal practice analysis; all it certifies is that the learner has successfully learnt the theory behind the practice. For this reason, should human error lead to damages, no recourse will be permitted to an academic institution, but in certain cases, recourse to a regulatory body may be possible.

A collaborative approach will result in a combined effort in terms of professional and academic qualifications, utilizing skills analyses and gap training to expedite the process. This will allow these qualifications to feed off of each other to produce a skilled workforce with knowledge and experience; the perfect solution to combating the current skills-short market.

Perhaps the employers should be asking themselves the question; “Who should be employed in this particular job – someone who is a thought leader and will ensure best practice via specialized knowledge and research (thus an academic appointment), or a skilled professional who will provide best practice application?’

Issued by Perfect Word Consulting (Pty) Ltd
Whilst both academic and professional qualifications are recognized and controlled by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and both are indicative of a certain level of achievement, the levels of recognition of these forms of qualification are not always on par

Our Partners & Training Provider​s

Ensure your training investment by selecting only authorized ICITP Training Partners. Only ICITP Authorized Learning Partners deliver the latest ICITP curriculum and authorized training relevant to the professional certification. Going through an authorized training provider ensures that you will gain the knowledge and skills needed to becoming a successful Information Technology Practitioner